Routines and Procedures

Hand Signals

My colleagues and I use a variety of hand signals in our classroom to avoid unnecessary disruptions and maintain focus and time on task. Three common hand signals: a signal to use bathroom; a signal for needing scrap paper; and a signal for asking a presenter to speak louder. We introduce all of the hand signals to students at the beginning of the year in a community-wide Town Hall Meeting.

Strategy Resources (2)
Teacher In Action
 
 
 
Student Handout
 
 
This is the slide from my Town Hall presentation that teaches my students how to ask to go to the bathroom or get water. During the Town Hall meeting, I ask all of my students to try it out. I also let them know that if they don't use the signal, they don't go!
 
Teacher In Action
 
 
Student Handout
 
 
This is the slide from my Town Hall presentation that teaches my students how to ask to go to the bathroom or get water. During the Town Hall meeting, I ask all of my students to try it out. I also let them know that if they don't use the signal, they don't go!
Aaron Kaswell
Middle School 88 Peter Rouget
Brooklyn, NY


 

About this strategy

Prep Time:
Quick
Subject:
Math
Grades:
Sixth grade, Seventh grade, Eighth grade
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