Assessment & Data

Mastery Zone

My blended classroom is based on the Flipped Mastery model (please see the "Introduction to Mastery Based Learning" strategy video). When my students think that they have mastered the skills and concepts in a particular lesson, they show their completed notes to me or my co-teacher and get a Mastery Quiz. Students then head to the Mastery Zone, which is a section of the classroom reserved for students taking Mastery Quizzes and Level Tests. There is no talking in the Mastery Zone and the only technology permitted is a calculator. If they achieve at an 80% or higher rate, students move forward in the curriculum. If not, they review the concepts and materials in the lesson and re-take the Mastery Quiz in the Mastery Zone when they are ready. The Mastery Zone assessment strategy is a concept I adapted from the Algebros Flipped Mastery program.

Strategy Resources (4)
Students In Action
 
 
Student Handout
 
 
This is an example of a mastery quiz my students will take once they have completed their notes and practice problems. Every mastery quiz is five questions, and my students must get a minimum of four questions correct (80%) move onto the next lesson. Level tests are 20 questions and my students must get 14 questions correct (70%) to move onto the next level.
Students In Action
 
 
In this photo, you can see the distinct areas of the room, with students working in groups in the front, and my students working independently on their quizzes in the Mastery Zone, which is located in the back of the room.
Strategy Explanation
 
 
This diagram gives an overview of the classroom set up, where students are grouped while working on lesson notes and practice problems, the Mastery Zone for mastery quizzes, a station where my students can pick up lesson packets, and an area where my students can go to for small group tutoring. As you can see, the room is divided into different areas, where my students move to depending on where they are in the mastery cycle.
Students In Action
 
 
Students In Action
 
 
In this photo, you can see the distinct areas of the room, with students working in groups in the front, and my students working independently on their quizzes in the Mastery Zone, which is located in the back of the room.
Strategy Explanation
 
 
This diagram gives an overview of the classroom set up, where students are grouped while working on lesson notes and practice problems, the Mastery Zone for mastery quizzes, a station where my students can pick up lesson packets, and an area where my students can go to for small group tutoring. As you can see, the room is divided into different areas, where my students move to depending on where they are in the mastery cycle.
Student Handout
 
 
This is an example of a mastery quiz my students will take once they have completed their notes and practice problems. Every mastery quiz is five questions, and my students must get a minimum of four questions correct (80%) move onto the next lesson. Level tests are 20 questions and my students must get 14 questions correct (70%) to move onto the next level.
Benjamin Siegel
New Visions Charter High School for the Humanities II
Bronx, NY


 

About this strategy

Prep Time:
Long
Subject:
Math
Grade:
Tenth grade
Similar Strategies
Assessment & Data
Jeff's Use of Assessments and Data

Assessment and data play a crucial role in a blended teacher’s classroom. Blended learning gives teachers an opportunity to assess consistently throughout a class, in a way that drives instruction, impacts grouping, and assignments. Blended educators have to develop capacity to sift through multiple sources of data and synthesizes quickly into action. Check out how Jeff utilizes Assessment and Data here.

 
Blended Learning Model Overviews
Jeff's Model Overview

I would describe my classroom model as a tweak on a flex model of instruction. I start each class period by giving students a problem I want them to solve, such as “How would you use the gas laws to explain how popcorn pops?” Students then have the opportunity to create their own learning paths by accessing a variety of curated online and offline resources and activities. I determine if a student has achieved mastery on a given concept by evaluating the online and offline work products they have produced during class and by administering more traditional assessments. However, if a student fails an assessment, he or she can always go back and re-take it. My classroom is 1:1 with a mix of MacBooks and iPads, which have become the vehicle for my students to move at their own pace through difficult chemistry content.

Number of Students: ~ 36 students/period

Number of Adults: one teacher

Length of Class Period/Learning Time: 120 minutes (M, T, Th, F); 45 minutes (W)

Digital Content/Ed Tech Tools Used on a Regular Basis: CK-12 BrainGenie; Google Apps for Education; eduCanon; Formative; YouTube; Screencast-O-Matic; Wikispaces; Weebly; Versal; Common Curriculum

Hardware Used on a Regular Basis: MacBook computers (1:1); 2nd Generation iPads; SMARTboard; Surface Pro 3 (for teacher)

Key Features: competency-based; content in multiple formats; problem-based; gamification; student agency

 
Independent Student Learning
Bonus Materials

Sometimes students need a lesson or concept explained to them in a different way than has been done in the video I recorded. For this reason, I try to find other resources for students to use to get unstuck.

 
 
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